To be the wife of a beheaded man; the mother of their daughter

Lined with pastel-coloured houses, the quiet street in a suburb of the small Croatian town where British aid worker David Haines lived is a world away from the raw desert where he met his end.
Inside his home – a white two-storey house, the red bricks of its unfinished attic still visible – his wife Dragana Prodanovic is holed up with their four-year-old daughter.
“Looking at his girl is like looking at my own grandchildren,” said a neighbour in his 60s, looking visibly shaken.
“After this, we wonder where this world is going,” he added.
(Picture for illustration purposes only by Fotolia.)
  • Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  • Aperture: f/5.6
  • Exposure: 1/160th
  • Focal Length: 50mm

To be the wife of a beheaded man; the mother of their daughter

Lined with pastel-coloured houses, the quiet street in a suburb of the small Croatian town where British aid worker David Haines lived is a world away from the raw desert where he met his end.

Inside his home – a white two-storey house, the red bricks of its unfinished attic still visible – his wife Dragana Prodanovic is holed up with their four-year-old daughter.

“Looking at his girl is like looking at my own grandchildren,” said a neighbour in his 60s, looking visibly shaken.

“After this, we wonder where this world is going,” he added.

(Picture for illustration purposes only by Fotolia.)

Gaza children back to school

As hundreds of thousands of Palestinian children returned to school in Gaza on Sunday, Azhar recited a poem eulogising her father, killed by Israeli shelling in the enclave’s recent conflict.

“Daddy, what can I tell you, if I say I love you it’s not enough,” the nine-year-old, who was beginning the fourth grade, read to a classroom of teary children.

“Today is the first day of school, so even though my dad was martyred in the war – I’m happy,” she told AFP with a smile.

Malala, no ordinary teen

Schoolgirl activist Malala Yousafzai’s courageous fight back from being shot by the Taliban has transformed her both into a symbol for human rights and a campaigner in global demand.

Few teenagers can say they have been nominated twice for the Nobel Peace Prize, or spent their 17th birthday lobbying Nigeria’s president to do more to free hundreds of girls kidnapped by radical militants.

But Malala is no ordinary teen.

She had already been in the public eye for years when a Taliban gunman boarded her school bus on October 9, 2012, asked “Who is Malala?”, and shot her in the head.